King Tut at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum

I’m heading home this weekend for the 4th of July and am now kind of curious to see the King Tut exhibit that has been touring around the country for the past couple of years (though it conspicuously skipped New York) and opened on Saturday at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum.  It’s kind of neat that the Children’s Museum is hosting it and not the Indianapolis Museum of Art or one of the universities but I’m kind of glad because being one of the best museums for children in the country, it doesn’t get as much cred as it deserves. Ok, I’ve said my piece.

Exhibit Dates:
June 27 – October 25, 2009

Exhibit Hours:
Friday – Saturday: 9 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Sunday – Thursday: June 28 – July 30: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Aug. 2 – mid-October: 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Final two weeks of the exhibit: (daily) 10 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.
First and Third Thursday of each month: 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Ticket Prices:
Adults: $25 Monday – Thursday / $30 Friday – Sunday
Children (2 – 17): $15 All Times
Seniors (60+): $23 Monday – Thursday / $27.50 Friday – Sunday
Adult Members: $15 All Times
Youth Members: $8 All Times
Toddlers under 2 are admitted free
Audio Tour: $7 All Times
Youth/Group/Member Audio Tour: $6 All Times

Over 130 treasures from the tomb of the “Boy King” and other important rulers from 2,000 years of ancient Egyptian history will be on exhibit at The Children’s Museum. The exhibit will feature striking objects from some of the most important rulers throughout 2,000 years of ancient Egyptian history, from the 4th Dynasty into the Late Period (about 2600 B.C. – 660 B.C.), many of which have never visited the United States.

Four galleries devoted to King Tut will correspond to the four rooms of his nearly intact tomb where the treasures were discovered by British explorer Howard Carter in 1922. Legendary artifacts from the antechamber, the annex, the treasury and the burial chamber will include Tutankhamun’s golden sandals, jewelry, furniture, weaponry and statuary. This blockbuster exhibit will also feature the largest image of King Tut ever found — a 10-foot statue that may have originally stood at his mortuary temple and retains much of its original paint, one of four gold and precious-stone-inlaid canopic jars and CT scans of Tut’s mummy.

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June 29, 2009. Tags: , , . Add this to your calendar, Becko, Museums/ Becky is nerding out again. 3 comments.